Eating the Mediterranean diet may lead to a longer life

CNN:  Eating a Mediterranean diet may be your key to living longer. That’s according to a new study led by Immaculata De Vivo, associate professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and Harvard Medical School. The diet involves eating items off a menu that is rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans and peas, unrefined grains, olive oil and fish. It keeps dairy, meat and saturated fats to a minimum. And you can have a glass of red wine with dinner without cheating.

Watch Here

Back to Axiom News

We may be able to reverse signs of early Alzheimer’s disease

 

CNN:  Alzheimer’s disease affects as many as 5 million Americans. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, and there is no cure. Yet a very small study out of UCLA is offering a glimmer of hope for those with what is often a hopeless diagnosis. Nine out of the 10 patients involved in the study, who were in various stages of dementia, say their symptoms were reversed after they participated in a rigorous program. The program included things like optimizing Vitamin D levels in the blood, using DHA supplements to bridge broken connections in the brain, optimizing gut health, and strategic fasting to normalize insulin levels.

Read More…

Back to Axiom News

Five surprising health benefits of cauliflower

 

Natural News: Cauliflower contains large quantities of sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), which are two phytochemicals with proven cancer-fighting properties. Like broccoli, cauliflower is a fantastic natural source of the B vitamin choline. Choline is a precursor to the important neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and an increased choline intake is regularly linked to improved cognitive function, particularly among fetuses.

Read More..

Back to Axiom News

Stress is harder on young women’s hearts, study finds

 

Fox News:  Young women with heart disease may take a harder hit from mental stress compared with their male counterparts, a new study suggests. The researchers said the effects of psychological stress, which don’t show up on heart patients’ regular medical tests, may partly explain why women with heart disease are more likely to die from heart attacks than are men with heart disease.

Read More…

Back to Axiom News

Are we on the road to an HIV vaccine?

 

CNN: Out of 1,800 people infected with HIV, Koff and his team found that 10% formed any of these antibodies and just 1% had extremely broad and potent antibodies against HIV. “We called them the elite neutralizers,” he said of the latter group. The problem, however, is that these antibodies form too late, when people are already infected. In fact, they usually only form a while after infection. The goal for vaccine teams is to get the body making these ahead of infection.

Read More…

Back to Axiom News

‘Brain changes’ seen in young American footballers

 

BBC: Even though players were not concussed during the season, researchers found abnormalities similar to the effects of mild traumatic brain injury. Twenty-four players aged between 16 and 18 were studied and devices on their helmets measured head impacts. The study was presented to the Radiological Society of North America. When players are hit, the brain moves violently within the skull. The harder the hit is, the more the brain is going to move” – Dr Alex Powers

Read More….

Back to Axiom News

Monkeys Steer Wheelchairs With Their Brains, Raising Hope for Paralyzed People

 

 

NatGeo: WASHINGTON, D.C.—Experimental wheelchairs and exoskeletons controlled by thought alone offer surprising insights into the brain, neuroscientists reported on Monday. “Some of our patients say they feel they are walking on sand,” says Nicolelis, describing pilot research in which eight paralyzed patients walked using a robotic exoskeleton that moved in response to readings of the patients’ brain waves. “We are actually fooling the brain of patients to think it is not a machine carrying them, but they feel they are themselves walking forward.”

Read More…

Back to Axiom News

Scientists Urge Study of Environmental Factors That May Speed Aging

 

NatGeo: Why do our bodies age at different rates? Why can some people run marathons at the age of 70, while others are forced to use a walker? Genes are only part of the answer. A trio of scientists from the University of North Carolina argue in a new paper that more work needs to be done on “gerontogens”—factors, including substances in the environment, that can accelerate the aging process.

Read More…

Back to Axiom News

High-fructose diet may contribute to anxiety, depression during adolescence

660_sugar

 

Fox News: Consuming excess fructose— a sugar commonly added to packaged foods and beverages— may worsen depression and anxiety in teenagers, new research suggests. In the animal study, presented Tuesday at an annual meeting for the Society for Neuroscience, scientists at Emory University in Atlanta found that fructose can alter how the brain responds to stress. People develop these brain processes during adolescence, which suggests that teens may be most vulnerable to fructose’s potential effects.

Read More…

Back to Axiom News